Agreement Sort

Agreement Sort

The treaty was submitted for ratification in December 2002. However, the adoption of the agreement lasted about a year, as the bill had to be reservient after it was rejected in committee due to concerns about the financing of nuclear forces and the cutting of systems that had not yet reached the end of their lifespan. MEPs also expressed concern about the ability of the United States to put reserve nuclear warheads online for a first shot (download potential). While President Bush declared that the treaty “liquidates the legacy of Cold War nuclear hostility” and his security adviser Condoleezza Rice said it should be considered “the last treaty of the last century”[5], others criticized the treaty for various reasons: the treaty between the United States of America and the Russian Federation on Strategic Offensive Reductions (SORT), Also known as the Moscow Treaty, was a strategic arms reduction treaty between the United States and Russia, in force from June 2003 until February 2011, when it was replaced by the New START Treaty. [1] At that time, SORT was positioned as “an important element of the new strategic relationship” between the two countries[2], with both sides pledging to limit their nuclear arsenal to 1700 to 2,200 operational warheads each. It was adopted on 24 Signed in Moscow on 1 May 2002.